WMU

Bible to Metaphysical Belt

When Dave and Mary Elliff left Arkansas, they left family and familiar culture to plant a new church in the pacific northwest.

“in the South, we have the Bible belt. In Seattle, people call Roosevelt, the neighborhood where we’re planting, the metaphysical Belt. 96% of the people here don’t attend an evangelical church,” says Dave. “it’s really well-known for New Age and eastern religion.”

The Eliffs launched Roots Community Church with just one other couple. They soon formed a core group trough community outreach and by recruiting others who felt called to serve in Seattle.

Creating Unity in Diversity

Toronto is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world. And although there’s a large Hispanic population, there are few Hispanic churches. J.D. and Andreina moved from Venezuela to plat one.

The Fasolinos started with a small group Bible study. Now Emmanuel Baptist Church East involves more than 70 people worshiping together, representing Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Cuba and Guatemala. They also have a ministry serving migrant workers on a local mushroom farm.

While diversity has its beauty, it also brings challenges.

“Because of diversity, some people tend to isolate and become lonely. There is a continuous sense of mourning-the same you have when you lose a loved one- but in this case because you lost your language, your traditions, your friends, family and even your food,” says J.D.

Plating Together

“We moved to Cincinnati to plant revive City Church. I realize now we were crazy. I walked away from a steady paycheck, and my wife was nine months pregnant,” Kirk explains. “When we started, we had no denomination or network behind us. We felt alone.”

They started their first church in a downtown, multi-ethnic area with great spiritual need. In 2016, they prayed about starting a second church. Only this time, they knew they did not have to do it alone.

“That’s when we became part of the Southern Baptist Convention, and it’s the best move we ever made,” says Kirk.

As Southern Baptist church planting missionaries, they Kirklands received the support to successfully launch a second church and expand their community outreach ministries. They now are looking forward to planting additional churches as God leads.

The Road to Recovery

The immediate threat has blown over, but hurricane Maria left a deep impact in social, emotional and financial sacrs on Puerto Rico. That overwhelming need is what drew Jonathan and Yesenia back to the island from their home in New York.

Jonathan serves as the director of send Relief Puerto Rico He works with local churches and agencies to identify people and communities in crisis ad match the needs with the counter relief teams arriving each week. Jonathan says that physical needs are easier to address, but it’s the emotional and spiritual issues that also must be acknowledged.

“although very religious, because of its catholic background that connects tour Spanish heritage, Puerto Rico is mostly lost. I always tell our volunteers, the most important part of their work isn’t the roof they are replacing, it’s the people under the roof,” says Jonathan.

Reaching the City Together 

After spending a decade in ministry in New Orleans, God called Rob and Annabeth to a new work. From their first visit, the Wiltons knew they were called to the historic city of Pittsburgh.

“There’s more than 2 million people, and the gospel hasn’t reached most of them. In lots of cities our size, Southern Baptist have started 20,30,40 churches in the last few years. But here, it’s hard. I can count the number of churches we’ve started on one hand,” explains Rob.

As the send City Missionary, Rob came to Pittsburgh-not just to plant a church-but to reach the city by inspiring planters to work together.

“I’m planting a church in southwest Pittsburgh. Our new church has united with existing plants to recruit, train and send new planters. As one team, we’re already seeing how God is making us stronger together,” says Rob.

Training the Next Generation

College students are shaping the future of North America by learning to live on mission.

Ebbie Davis first came to San Diego as a college student in 2015 with NAMB’s GenSend student missionary program. Then, God called her to go back and become a church planting team member and GenSend city coach.

“We have eight students who previously participated in the program and now live life on mission in San Diego. When you give, it invests in people like us,” explains Ebbie

In the summer-long program, college students work alongside a church plant or in a compassion ministry.

“They develop habits and tools to take back home with them-whenever that be in another city, in rural farm town or in preparation to come back to our city and serve here.” Says Ebbie.

The Mission Field is Here

God began pursuing Mojic in Mongolia where he grew up as an atheist, He heard the gospel from a college friend and gave his life to Christ. Soon after, he felt called to attend seminary.

“My wife and I had been praying about starting a church somewhere in America. We felt called to share the gospel with the thousands of Mongolians who had moved to the states,” explains Mojic. “And that’s how we ended up leaving Mongolia and moving here.”

Denver’s growing Mongolian population is estimated to be over 1500. Most of Mojic’s church members are first-generation immigrants and were raised atheist like he was. It is a challenge to overcome their worldview and cultural influences.

“People might think it’s strange for missionaries like us to leave our country and come to America, but I think we need to shift or thinking,” says Mojic. “The mission field is here.”

Bible to Metaphysical Belt

When Dave and Mary Elliff left Arkansas, they left family and familiar culture to plant a new church in the pacific northwest.

“in the South, we have the Bible belt. In Seattle, people call Roosevelt, the neighborhood where we’re planting, the metaphysical Belt. 96% of the people here don’t attend an evangelical church,” says Dave. “it’s really well-known for New Age and eastern religion.”

The Eliffs launched Roots Community Church with just one other couple. They soon formed a core group trough community outreach and by recruiting others who felt called to serve in Seattle.

Creating Unity in Diversity

Toronto is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world. And although there’s a large Hispanic population, there are few Hispanic churches. J.D. and Andreina moved from Venezuela to plat one.

The Fasolinos started with a small group Bible study. Now Emmanuel Baptist Church East involves more than 70 people worshiping together, representing Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Cuba and Guatemala. They also have a ministry serving migrant workers on a local mushroom farm.

While diversity has its beauty, it also brings challenges.

“Because of diversity, some people tend to isolate and become lonely. There is a continuous sense of mourning-the same you have when you lose a loved one- but in this case because you lost your language, your traditions, your friends, family and even your food,” says J.D.

Plating Together

“We moved to Cincinnati to plant revive City Church. I realize now we were crazy. I walked away from a steady paycheck, and my wife was nine months pregnant,” Kirk explains. “When we started, we had no denomination or network behind us. We felt alone.”

They started their first church in a downtown, multi-ethnic area with great spiritual need. In 2016, they prayed about starting a second church. Only this time, they knew they did not have to do it alone.

“That’s when we became part of the Southern Baptist Convention, and it’s the best move we ever made,” says Kirk.

As Southern Baptist church planting missionaries, they Kirklands received the support to successfully launch a second church and expand their community outreach ministries. They now are looking forward to planting additional churches as God leads.

The Road to Recovery

The immediate threat has blown over, but hurricane Maria left a deep impact in social, emotional and financial sacrs on Puerto Rico. That overwhelming need is what drew Jonathan and Yesenia back to the island from their home in New York.

Jonathan serves as the director of send Relief Puerto Rico He works with local churches and agencies to identify people and communities in crisis ad match the needs with the counter relief teams arriving each week. Jonathan says that physical needs are easier to address, but it’s the emotional and spiritual issues that also must be acknowledged.

“although very religious, because of its catholic background that connects tour Spanish heritage, Puerto Rico is mostly lost. I always tell our volunteers, the most important part of their work isn’t the roof they are replacing, it’s the people under the roof,” says Jonathan.

Reaching the City Together 

After spending a decade in ministry in New Orleans, God called Rob and Annabeth to a new work. From their first visit, the Wiltons knew they were called to the historic city of Pittsburgh.

“There’s more than 2 million people, and the gospel hasn’t reached most of them. In lots of cities our size, Southern Baptist have started 20,30,40 churches in the last few years. But here, it’s hard. I can count the number of churches we’ve started on one hand,” explains Rob.

As the send City Missionary, Rob came to Pittsburgh-not just to plant a church-but to reach the city by inspiring planters to work together.

“I’m planting a church in southwest Pittsburgh. Our new church has united with existing plants to recruit, train and send new planters. As one team, we’re already seeing how God is making us stronger together,” says Rob.

Training the Next Generation

College students are shaping the future of North America by learning to live on mission.

Ebbie Davis first came to San Diego as a college student in 2015 with NAMB’s GenSend student missionary program. Then, God called her to go back and become a church planting team member and GenSend city coach.

“We have eight students who previously participated in the program and now live life on mission in San Diego. When you give, it invests in people like us,” explains Ebbie

In the summer-long program, college students work alongside a church plant or in a compassion ministry.

“They develop habits and tools to take back home with them-whenever that be in another city, in rural farm town or in preparation to come back to our city and serve here.” Says Ebbie.

The Mission Field is Here

God began pursuing Mojic in Mongolia where he grew up as an atheist, He heard the gospel from a college friend and gave his life to Christ. Soon after, he felt called to attend seminary.

“My wife and I had been praying about starting a church somewhere in America. We felt called to share the gospel with the thousands of Mongolians who had moved to the states,” explains Mojic. “And that’s how we ended up leaving Mongolia and moving here.”

Denver’s growing Mongolian population is estimated to be over 1500. Most of Mojic’s church members are first-generation immigrants and were raised atheist like he was. It is a challenge to overcome their worldview and cultural influences.

“People might think it’s strange for missionaries like us to leave our country and come to America, but I think we need to shift or thinking,” says Mojic. “The mission field is here.”

What is WMU?

Women’s Missionary Union (WMU) is an organization of women dedicated to supporting missions through prayer, giving, and service.

PRAY- WMU supports Missions and missionaries through avid intercessory prayer.

GIVE- WMU supports the following offerings through giving to the Global Mission Fund: Annie Armstrong, Lottie Moon, Janie Chapman, and Evelyn Henderson.

GO- WMU supports missions by volunteering to assist with mission projects.

How do I get Involved?

WMU has several ways to get involved. They have their women on mission (WOM) general meeting one Monday a month where they pray for our missionaries and plan for ways to serve local ministries.

MPACT Kids is run by WMU members as they work to train our children to love Jesus and to tell others about him. MPACT Kids meets on Wednesday nights from 6:45 to 7:30 pm.

For any other questions you may have on WMU email mpact@fbs.org to get more information.

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