Stigma Busters

Oct 5, 2020 | Uncategorized

Humble, Helpful, Brave, Bold

words from Billy Graham, C. H. Spurgeon, Abraham Lincoln, & Hershel Walker

Billy Graham

The older I get the more I marvel at the complexity of our minds. The psalmist exclaimed, “I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalms 139:14). I used to think this verse referred only to our bodies, but I realize now that it applies to our whole beings, including our minds and emotions. God made you a unique, complex person, and just as your body is uniquely yours, so too is your personality. We truly are “fearfully and wonderfully made!”

Like everything else, however, our emotions have been corrupted by sin. Emotions aren’t bad in themselves, but they can become twisted or even destructive. They may even become so overwhelming, that we require professional help to restore us to health. We still have so much to learn about the human mind, but I’m thankful for gifted counselors and psychologist who seek to help those suffering from serious emotional problems.

 

Graham, Billy “The Journey: How To Live By Faith In An Uncertain World” p.177-178.

God made you a unique, complex person, and just as your body is uniquely yours, so too is your personality.

Ask not ‘why are they so nervous and so absurdly fearful?’ No… I beseech you, remember that you understand not your fellow man.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon 

Spurgeon in sermon “Israel’s God and God’s Israel.”

I suppose that some brethren neither have much elevation or depression. I could almost wish to share their peaceful life. For I am much tossed up and down, and although my joy is greater than the most of men, my depression of spirit is such as few can have an idea of.

Spurgeon, in sermon “Man Unknown to Man.”

Especially judge not the sons and daughters of sorrow. Allow no ungenerous suspicions of the afflicted, the poor, and the despondent. 

Do not hastily say they ought to be more brave, and exhibit a greater faith. Ask not ‘why are they so nervous and so absurdly fearful?’ No… I beseech you, remember that you understand not your fellow man.

Spurgeon in sermon “The Saddest Cry from the Cross.”

Strong-minded people are very apt to be hard upon nervous folk and to speak harshly to people who are very depressed in spirit, saying ‘really, you ought to rouse yourself out of that state’.

Taken from Zack Eswine’s “Spurgeon’s Sorrows” and Michael Reeve’s discussion of Spurgeon’s depression.

https://thewearychristian.com/spurgeons-greatest-hits-on-depression-anxiety-and-panic/

 

 

Abraham Lincoln

Fortunately for Lincoln and the country, he learned to defeat depression and he maintained a healthy attitude about it. “A tendency to melancholy….,” he wrote in a letter to a friend, “let it be observed, is a misfortune, not a fault.” The unfortunate stigma surrounding depression and mental illness that exists today was not as prevalent in Lincoln’s day.

His humility allowed him to accept his own failures and not be threatened by the success of others. So his moods were not affected by his own success or failures. Lincoln also used his faith to bolster him in times of hardship and depression.

 

 

Street, Elizabeth. “Overcoming Obstacles: How Abraham Lincoln Defeated Depression,”

Learning Liftoff  Jan 6, 2015.

    https://www.learningliftoff.com/overcoming-obstacles-how-abraham-lincoln-defeated-depression/

 

A tendency to melancholy . . . is a misfortune, not a fault.

During the most trying times, when I was struggling the most with the diagnosis and the stigma of having a mental illness, . . . . I remembered Mama sitting in an old rocking chair, slowly rocking back and forth with that big black book, the Bible in her lap.

Hershel Walker

“My treatment was also supplemented by my faith in God. During the most trying times, when I was struggling the most with the diagnosis and the stigma of having a mental illness, I called upon my life long faith and the lessons my mother taught me. I remembered Mama sitting in an old rocking chair, slowly rocking back and forth with that big black book, the Bible in her lap.”

Walker, Hershel. “Breaking Free: My Life with Dissociative Identity Disorder” p.222

 

OUR TEAM

Dr. Keith Phillips

New Day Counseling Director

Keith Phillips DMin., LPC, LPC-S, is a Licensed Professional Counselor and a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor. His therapy style is a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy integrated with a biblical worldview; he is also certified as a Prepare and Enrich Marriage Counselor and an Anger Management Specialist.

More About Keith

Keith has worked with substance abuse clients at Miracle Hill Ministries and The Forrester Center. Prior to receiving his Doctorate of Ministry from North Greenville University, he received his Master of Arts in Professional Counseling and Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Liberty University. Keith also serves as Single Adults Minister (ages 40+) at First Baptist Spartanburg.

Dr. Keith Phillips' services include:

Premarital / Marital • Divorce • Career Guidance • Pornography • Grief & Loss • Anger • PTSD • Substance Addiction • Single Parenting • Blended Families • Anxiety & Depression • Coping Skills • OCD

Supervision

 Keith offers (fee based) individual and group supervision for graduate level counseling students and LPC Associates interested in obtaining licensure in SC.

Deandra Comer

Student Counselor / Girls Ministry Director

Deandra Comer received her Master of Arts in Professional Counseling from Liberty University and is pursuing her state licensure certification. Deandra counsels with preschoolers, young girls, boys, and ladies.

More about Deandra

Deandra's training experience includes work at Middle Tyger Community Center, Miracle Hill Ministries, and in the public school system. She also serves in our student’s ministry here at First Baptist working with girls.

Deandra Comer's services include:

Premarital / Marital • Eating Disorders • Career Guidance • ODD • Grief & Loss • Anger • PTSD • Addictions • Sexual Abuse • Blended Families • Anxiety & Depression • Coping Skills 

Norma Lynn Phillips

New Day Counseling Office Manager

Norma Lynn Phillips is the office manager, “communication hub” of New Day Counseling, scheduling appointments, sending forms, and providing office support. She has also served in First Baptist Preschool and Missions Ministry. She takes joy in connecting with and helping people, which is why she loves working with New Day!

Erica McKee

New Day Master's Level Intern

Erica McKee is a graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at Gardner Webb University. Erica completed her practicum work at the Cleveland County Abuse Prevention office and began her intern work at New Day at the beginning of 2020. After a brief summer absence, she is now returning to us with the anticipation of completing her internship and graduating in December 2020. She is familiar with Play Therapy for children as well as working with teens and older adolescents. She is an active volunteer at her church as well as with the Crisis Pregnancy Center of Cleveland County. Please feel free to contact us to discuss an appointment with Erica.

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